Historical Fantasy Fiction

Tired of present day magical, supernatural urban fantasy fiction? And do you feel that the dystopian futuristic fiction category is heavily saturated?

Then why not try fantasy fiction set in the past? And by that I mean late 20th century/early 21st century authors writing fantasy set in the past —the historical past.

I just can’t help but admire authors that took the time to research just to ensure that the story feels authentically in the past. And yet at the same time, they managed to create a story that managed to suck me in.

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Retellings: Why do we get new ones every year?

I think we’ve tackled this with my previous post about whether retellings are fanfics.

But honestly, we get new retellings every year. Whether it’s in book form, TV form, Movie Form or Disney form.

Why is that so? I think it’s simply because they work. People love these stories for as long as we can remember. But at the same time, they are tired of hearing the same story. Hence we get familiar stories adapted or told differently.

I don’t think people (myself included) care who originally thought these stories up. It doesn’t really matter how similar the story is (because at this day and age, what story can truly be called original) as long as it entertains.

So here are some of the retellings that have entertained me so far:

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Djinn Protagonist

For anyone who decides to read books that center around djinn or djinni or jinni, you often noticed one common factor.

At least one (who may or may not be the main character) is under some form of slavery. Like the Jinni on Aladdin, the djinn character is bound to grant their “master” or “owner’s” wishes whether the djinn wants to do it or not.

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Creepy but Cute

The following titles are recommendations to readers who want a frightened “AHHHH!!!” added with a heartwarming “AWWWWWWW”

A word of warning that dark and/or brutal scenes abound in the following books. But also expect moments of tenderness and love that only serve to highlight  both aspects of the story. Because let’s face it, how can you truly appreciate works that may (or may not) kill off characters if you don’t even care about the characters?

And how exactly do you realize the depth of love you have for the fictional characters of a story if you don’t have a sinking feeling that they might be lost or hurt beyond repair?

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